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pISSN 2288-6982
eISSN 2288-7105

Article

Article

ARTICLE

Phys. Ther. Korea 2017; 24(1): 79-85

Published online February 28, 2017

https://doi.org/10.12674/ptk.2017.24.1.079

© Korean Research Society of Physical Therapy

1Kinetic Ergocise Based on Movement Analysis Laboratory,
2Dept. of Physical Therapy, The Graduate School, Yonsei University,
3Dept. of Rehabilitation Medicine, Wonju Severance Christian Hospital,
4Dept. of Physical Therapy, College of Health Science, Yonsei University,
5Dept. of Ergonomic Therapy, The Graduate School of Health and Environment, Yonsei University

Comparison of Knee Extensor and Hip Extensor Strength According to Wall Squat Performance

Sung-hoon Jung1,2, Moon-hwan Kim1,3, Ui-jae Hwang1,2, Jun-hee Kim1,2, Oh-yun Kwon1,4,5

Correspondence to: Corresponding author: Oh-yun Kwon kwonoy@yonsei.ac.kr

Received: January 2, 2017; Revised: January 2, 2017; Accepted: January 31, 2017

Abstract

Background:

The wall squat is considered an effective exercise because it can reduce the knee load and prevent excessive lumbar movement. However, the relationship between wall squat performance and strength of knee extensors and hip extensors remained unclear.

Objects:

The purpose of this study was to compare the strengths of the knee extensors and hip extensors between groups with low and high wall squat performance.

Method:

Nineteen males (low performance group: 9 subjects, high performance group: 10 subjects) participated in this study and performed wall squats. The subjects who were performing less than 30% of the average wall squat count were classified into the low wall squat performance group (less than or equal to 4 times) and the subjects who performed more than 30% of the average wall squat count were classified into the high wall squat performance group (greater than or equal to 8 times). Knee extensor and hip extensor strength were measured with a strength measurement system. An independent t-test was used to compare the strengths of the knee extensors and hip extensors between the groups with low and high wall squat performance.

Results:

The ratios of knee extensor and hip extensor strength to bodyweight were greater in the high wall squat performance group than in the low wall squat performance group (knee extensors: p<.001; hip extensors: p=.03). In the high- and low-performance groups, the ratios of knee extensor strength to bodyweight were 42.74±5.72 and 30.76±8.54, respectively, and the ratios of hip extensor strength to bodyweight were 31.95±10.61 and 20.66±11.25, respectively.

Conclusion:

Our findings suggest that knee extensor and hip extensor strength are needed for high wall squat performance. Thus, exercise to increase the knee and hip extensors strength can be recommended to improve squat performance.

Keywords: Hip extensors, Knee extensors, Strength, Wall squat performance